Can you stop taking antidepressants?

It’s important that you do not stop taking antidepressants suddenly. A dose of antidepressants should be slowly reduced, normally over 4 weeks, but sometimes longer. This is to prevent any withdrawal symptoms you might get as a reaction to coming off antidepressants suddenly.

Can you eventually stop taking antidepressants?

If you decide to stop taking antidepressants, don’t quit taking them on your own. And don’t stop all at once. A major drop in medication levels can trigger a relapse or other harmful symptoms, such as suicidal thoughts. Work with your doctor to create a plan to gradually reduce your medication dose over time.

Is it worth stopping antidepressants?

Besides easing the transition, tapering the dose decreases the risk that depression will recur. In a Harvard Medical School study, nearly 400 patients (two-thirds of them women) were followed for more than a year after they stopped taking antidepressants prescribed for mood and anxiety disorders.

Does your brain go back to normal after antidepressants?

The process of healing the brain takes quite a bit longer than recovery from the acute symptoms. In fact, our best estimates are that it takes 6 to 9 months after you are no longer symptomatically depressed for your brain to entirely recover cognitive function and resilience.

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How can I get off antidepressants naturally?

Keeping these tips in mind can help the process go as smoothly as possible.

  1. Talk to your doctor first. …
  2. Give antidepressants a chance. …
  3. Know what affects your taper. …
  4. Remember that tapering can take time. …
  5. Use a mood calendar. …
  6. Keep healthy habits as you taper. …
  7. Stay in touch with your doctor. …
  8. Ask family and friends for support.

What is the hardest antidepressant to come off of?

Hardest-to-Stop Antidepressants

  • citalopram) (Celexa)
  • escitalopram (Lexapro)
  • paroxetine (Paxil)
  • sertraline (Zoloft)

What does it feel like coming off antidepressants?

Individuals may experience one or more of the following when coming off antidepressants: flu-like symptoms, such as chills and muscle aches. fatigue (lack of energy) headaches.

Do antidepressants shorten your life?

The analysis found that in the general population, those taking antidepressants had a 33 percent higher risk of dying prematurely than people who were not taking the drugs. Additionally, antidepressant users were 14 percent more likely to have an adverse cardiovascular event, such as a stroke or a heart attack.

Do antidepressants ruin your brain?

We know that antipsychotics shrink the brain in a dose-dependent manner (4) and benzodiazepines, antidepressants and ADHD drugs also seem to cause permanent brain damage (5).

How do you know when you don’t need an antidepressant anymore?

Common symptoms associated with discontinuation syndrome include feeling dizzy, achy, tingling, nauseated, and fatigued, much like having the flu. An easy way to tell if you’re going through discontinuation syndrome is to take a dose of the medication that you’re tapering from.

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Which antidepressants have the worst withdrawal symptoms?

People taking Paxil and Effexor often have more intense withdrawal symptoms. These drugs have short half-lives and leave the body faster than drugs with long half-lives. The faster an antidepressant leaves the body, the worse the withdrawal symptoms. This is because of the sudden imbalance of chemicals in the brain.

How do you transition off antidepressants?

Discontinuing an antidepressant usually involves reducing your dose in increments, allowing two to six weeks or longer between dose reductions. Your clinician can instruct you in tapering your dose and prescribe the appropriate dosage pills.

What happens if you miss three days of antidepressants?

Missed or extra doses

It’s important not to miss any of your doses, as this could make your treatment less effective. You may also get withdrawal symptoms as a result of missing a dose of the medicine. If you do miss 1 of your doses, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the usual time.