Should I stay on antidepressants forever?

MYTH: Once on antidepressants, I’ll be on them for life. FACT: Not true. A general rule clinicians often use is that a person should be treated with antidepressants at least one-and-a-half times as long as the duration of the depressive episode before they can begin to be weaned off.

Is it bad to stay on antidepressants long term?

“These medications have been around for decades,” says Dr. Jin Hee Yoon-Hudman, a psychiatrist and medical advisor at Minded. “There’s really no evidence that people have had serious side effects or adverse effects from being on SSRI medications for too long.”

Can you be on antidepressants permanently?

Long-term antidepressant users are risking permanent damage to their bodies, according to leading medical experts. Dr Tony Kendrick, a professor of primary care at the University of Southampton, says more urgent action needs to be taken to encourage and support long-term users to come off the medication.

How long should you stay on antidepressants?

You may be tempted to stop taking antidepressants as soon as your symptoms ease, but depression can return if you quit too soon. Clinicians generally recommend staying on the medication for six to nine months before considering going off antidepressants.

Do antidepressants take years off your life?

The analysis found that in the general population, those taking antidepressants had a 33 percent higher risk of dying prematurely than people who were not taking the drugs.

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Is it OK to be on Lexapro forever?

Are There Any Risks For Taking Escitalopram For Long Periods Of Time? To date, there are no known problems associated with long term use of escitalopram. It is a safe and effective medication when used as directed.

Does your brain go back to normal after antidepressants?

The process of healing the brain takes quite a bit longer than recovery from the acute symptoms. In fact, our best estimates are that it takes 6 to 9 months after you are no longer symptomatically depressed for your brain to entirely recover cognitive function and resilience.